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Read both current and past press releases about or related to the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics here, as well as links to coverage by other publications.

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First Draft of U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics: Version 2.0 Available for Review; Comments Welcomed

Today, the first draft of the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics: Version 2.0 was released. Published as a downloadable PDF on the homepage here, the Roadmap 2.0’s report and action plan draft is open for review, comments and additional input from the public until Monday, February 6, 2017. Its purpose is to help the industry determine how logistics and supply chain trends and challenges can be turned into action plans to develop needed capabilities in the U.S. between now and 2030.

Coordinating the review and comment process is Roadmap 2.0 report editor Gary Forger, Consultant to MHI. He particularly looks forward to the industry’s feedback and additional input on this first draft, which should be routed to him directly at gforger@mhi.org.

“The original Roadmap, published in January 2014, was a high-level look forward to 2025. It identified a baseline of key disruptors faced by today’s supply chain practitioners, as well as the core competencies they must develop in order to thrive in the coming decade,” he explains. “But within the last three years, the staggering rate of change impacting material handling and logistics demanded a second look. We’ve also taken a new approach in organizing the report, which now focuses on four key supply chain forces: technology, consumers, workforce and logistics infrastructure. I’m eager to see the response.”

The content of this initial draft is based on input from nearly 200 strategic thinkers—70 percent of whom did not participate in the development of the first Roadmap—including material handling and logistics practitioners, equipment and software suppliers, academia, associations and government. They participated in one of five roundtable events held August through November 2016, dividing into nearly 70 different discussion topic breakout sessions. Attendees contributed their insights on both recent and anticipated developments in the field, as well as further explored the core competencies that companies will have to develop within the next decade.

A seven-person writing team developed the Roadmap 2.0’s first draft. They include:

  • Charles Edwards, North Carolina Department of Transportation
  • Alan Erera, Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech)
  • Bill Ferrell, Clemson University
  • Gary Forger, Consultant to MHI
  • Steve Hopper, Inviscid Consulting
  • Dana Magliola, Supply Chain Resource Cooperative at North Carolina State University
  • David Schneider, We Are The Practitioners - David K Schneider & Company

Upon its completion, the Roadmap 2.0 will be released during MHI’s ProMat (www.promatshow.com) tradeshow and exposition, on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 at McCormick Place in Chicago.

The Roadmap 2.0 is a collaborative industry effort, involving five association partners and seven publication partners.

Association Partners:

  • Center for Excellence in Logistics and Distribution (CELDi)
  • College Industry Council on Material Handling Education (CICMHE)
  • Material Handling Equipment Distributors Association (MHEDA)
  • MHI
  • Warehousing Education and Research Council (WERC)

Publication Partners:

  • CSCMP’s Supply Chain Quarterly
  • DC Velocity
  • Inbound Logistics
  • Logistics Management
  • Material Handling & Logistics
  • Modern Materials Handling
  • Supply Chain Management Review

MHI is providing administrative and financial support for the development of the Roadmap 2.0. For more information visit www.MHLroadmap.org or email info@MHLroadmap.org.


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Roundtable Summit Dates Announced for Development of U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics: Version 2.0
Strategic thinkers—including material handling and logistics practitioners, equipment and software suppliers, academia, associations and government—are invited to contribute their insights on the future of the U.S. supply chain at one of four roundtable summit events to be held throughout the second half of 2016. Collected input will form the foundation of the second edition of the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics, a 70-page report originally released in January 2014 on www.MHLroadmap.org.

“The first Roadmap was called by some ‘the most important document to be published by the industry in more than 20 years,’” recalls Gary Forger, who spearheaded the original effort to develop the document. “It established a baseline of key disruptors faced by supply chain practitioners today and in the approaching decade. While it was comprehensive for the time, the staggering rate of change in the field during the recent past has prompted us to begin work on the second edition.”

As with the first Roadmap, content for the second edition will be gleaned from input gathered during four roundtable summits at four locations across the country. Attendees will engage in a full day of face-to-face, full group and breakout sessions hosted by local industry thought leaders.

“The intent of this new series of summits is to capture the most recent developments in the field,” Forger continues. “For example, physical and cyber security weren’t addressed in the first edition of the Roadmap; today they’ve become critical factors to ensure business success.”

Participants will also further explore the core competencies companies will have to develop over the next decade to grow jobs, increase America’s global competitiveness and advance our country’s standard of living, he adds.

The summit dates and locations are:

  • August 30, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia,
  • September 13, 2016 in Trenton, New Jersey,
  • October 5, 2016 in Ontario, California, and
  • November 9, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.

Participation in the roundtable summits is by invitation only, with approximately 40 different contributors expected to participate at each summit. Persons who are interested in receiving an invitation to attend one of the sessions may contact Gary Forger at gforger@mhi.org.

Upon completion of the four summits, the gathered information will be used as the basis for the writing of the second edition of the Roadmap. The report will be released during MHI’s ProMat tradeshow and exposition, held April 3-6, 2017 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois.

MHI is providing administrative and financial support for the development of the Roadmap. For more information, visit www.MHLroadmap.org or email Gary Forger, gforger@mhi.org.

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NC State Supply Chain Resource Cooperative MBA students research the economic impact of North Carolina’s supply chain industry
Underwritten by MHI, a new analysis and report developed by three of North Carolina State University's Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) fellows has been released. The report, “Understanding the Economic Impact of North Carolina's Supply Chain: Conduit for Prosperity and Economic Development,” and provides detailed perspective on the importance of the supply chain in North Carolina. It was researched and prepared by SCRC fellows Dana A. Magliola, Lindsay T. Schilleman and John C. Elliott, three Jenkins’ masters of business administration (MBA) graduate students at NC State’s Poole College of Management.

Elliott initially started the research during the spring 2015 semester, focusing first on the transportation sector within the Tar Heel state. Magliola and Schilleman then took over the project in the subsequent fall 2015 semester. The pair was tasked with expanding Elliott’s initial work into a wider examination of the North Carolina supply chain and its economic impact, both within the state and on the broader national economy. Areas for analysis included direct, indirect and induced employment, labor income, output, gross domestic product (GDP) contribution and taxes.

The undertaking was, in a word, enormous.

“We discovered that a comprehensive view of the supply chain had never been done before, at least not in North Carolina that we are aware of,” Schilleman says. “In fact, it almost became two research projects—one to figure out how to do a state-level supply chain economic impact analysis, and the second to actually do the analysis itself.”

For that reason, Magliola and Schilleman captured the best practices they noted in other economic impact studies and developed a “how to” guide included in the final report, explaining their methodology. “We saw an opportunity to bring all these best practices into a step-by-step, systematic process to help others who might want to undertake their own supply chain economic impact analysis elsewhere,” notes Magliola.

Their first task, recalls Schilleman, was to define the supply chain. “That led us to identify 14 different supply chain sectors within North Carolina,” she says. Leading sectors include Pharmaceutical, Biologics & Medical Products, Chemical Manufacturing, Industrial Machinery & Transportation Equipment Manufacturing, Transportation, Distribution & Logistics and Tobacco & Foodstuffs.

“We also felt that it was important to bring the numbers into context, not just within the state, but also nationally and globally,” explains Magliola. “We ultimately settled on a parallel format for each section of the report, allowing us to talk about each sector in the same narrative style, which we think makes it easier for the audience to better understand each sector’s impact.”

According to the report, North Carolina supply chain industries employ nearly 12% of the state’s workforce, or more than 479,800 employees. Supply chain average labor income is more than $67,700, 56% higher than the state’s average non-farm wage. Indirect and induced impact on North Carolina’s economy accounts for an additional 770,000 jobs across all industries. Together that represents more than 31% of North Carolina’s entire labor force.

Interestingly, industries that the state is known for—including textiles, furniture and tobacco—are still relevant contributors to the economy, while newer sectors (such as pharmaceuticals and biologics) are gaining ground. “In the more-established sectors, North Carolina clearly has the lion’s share of a shrinking market,” says Magliola. “From a planning and policy standpoint, the state needs to be thinking about what measures to take to replace this potential hole in the economy as the dynamics continue to change.”

For that reason, Magliola and Schilleman presented a preview of the report to members of the Port and Rail subcommittee of the North Carolina State House Select Committee on Strategic Transportation Planning and Long Term Funding Solutions on February 1. The report was formally released on February 9 in Charlotte, at the Council for Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Charlotte Roundtable.

Additionally, the pair will present the report on April 4 at MODEX 2016 in Atlanta at 1:00 p.m., as part of the Supply Chain Education Summit.

“It’s been interesting to see how many audiences are finding the report to be of interest,” Magliola concludes. “We thought about that as we were writing it. For any policy maker or business person who wants to understand what the North Carolina landscape really looks like, this is an excellent resource for them.”

The full report can be accessed here.

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Dana A. Magliola



Lindsay T. Schillema



John C. Elliott


Latin American Spanish Translation of U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics Released

(Vista en español)
The U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics, originally released in January 2014, has been translated into Spanish for distribution in Central and South America. The translation is published on www.MHLroadmap.org, and replicates the original 67-page Roadmap report and action plan. The document provides a framework to help the industry identify the logistics and supply chain disruptors that can be turned into action plans to develop core competencies needed in the U.S. between now and 2025.

The translation was spearheaded by Edgar Ramos, Professor of Supply Chain Management at Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas, with collaborators Angel Hurtado, an independent consultant in innovation and technology management; Edwin Montes, Professor of Strategy Marketing at Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola; and Ruth Arano Stanton, independent consultant.

Ramos had already integrated the original English version of the document into his teaching materials for the first session of the undergraduate Supply Chain Management course he’s teaching at Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas in Lima, Peru. Further, he’d used the document for the Logistics Executive Seminar at Universidad de Piura, and during an Operations and Logistics Management course at Universidad Nacional Pedro Ruiz Gallo, as discussion material for the topic of Trends and Technology in Supply Chain.


Download the Spanish
Roadmap here


Edgar Ramos, Professor of Supply Chain Management at Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas

The Roadmap’s content is based on input from more than 100 U.S. thought leaders—including material handling and logistics practitioners, suppliers, academia, associations and government. Contributors shared their thoughts regarding the capabilities that the industry needs to develop between now and 2025.

So why would a U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics be relevant to Latin America?

“The importance is to recognize the gap between logistics and supply chains in developed countries, in this case the U.S., and emerging countries in Latin America,” Ramos explains. “With the document translated into Spanish, we can reach more Latin American experts in the different industries and academic programs to help prioritize our focus for improving our region’s logistics and supply chain practices.”

With the translation now complete, Ramos has scheduled it as a component of a program for Latin American supply chain leaders in June 2016, during a discussion of the Future of Supply Chain. Additionally, Ramos will be hosting a session to kick off the development of a supply chain and logistics Roadmap for Peru in mid-May, 2016.

“I am scheduling several roundtable discussions with many different universities and supply chain/logistics programs here in Peru as part of creating that Roadmap,” he adds. “Peru’s industry leaders and public entities have also been invited to participate in the sessions. I'm eager to get started.”

For more information, visit www.MHLroadmap.org or email info@MHLroadmap.org.


What's Next for the Roadmap?  
Gary Forger, Managing Director of Professional Development at MHI, shared an update on the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics—and the plans for further Roadmap development in 2016—with Mitch MacDonald, Group Editorial Director of Roadmap publication partner DC Velocity on DCV-TV Channel 1.

WATCH VIDEO


Video with Mitch MacDonald, Group Editorial Director of Roadmap publication partner DC Velocity on DCV-TV Channel 1


The U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics in the News

Several media outlets and blogs have published articles about the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics, including these:

January 2015
Inbound Logistics, "Traditional Supply Chain Models Will Be Extinct in 2025, Thanks to These 10 Disruptors"

August 2014

July 2014

June 2014

May 2014

April 2014

March 2014

February 2014

January 2014

December 2013

November 2013

October 2013

August 2013

May 2013

April 2013

March 2013


Press Release Archives

September 5, 2013: U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics Focus of Panel Discussion at MHI’s Annual Meeting

June 28, 2013: Chicago Hosts Final Roundtable Meeting of Contributors to Development of U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics

June 6, 2013: U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics’ Third Development Roundtable Meeting Concluded in Los Angeles

May 9, 2013: Second Roundtable Meeting for Development of the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics Hosted in Washington D.C.

April 29, 2013: First Meeting Held in Atlanta to Develop the U.S. Roadmap for Material Handling & Logistics

March 4, 2013: Material Handling and Logistics Industry Developing U.S. Roadmap

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